Review of Environment, Energy and Economics - Re3 COP21 Side Event on Multi-level Climate Governance
 

 

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Dec
10
2015
 
COP21 Side Event on Multi-level Climate Governance
by Almut Arneth, Scott Barrett, Carlo Carraro, Edoardo Croci, Christopher Kennedy, Benedetta Lucchitta, Giandomenico Magliano, Massimo Tavoni
Environment - Video
 

The side event “Multi-level Climate Governance: an integrated Analysis of National, Regional and Local Policies” aimed at assessing the current framework of multi-level governance for climate change control, providing an integrated analysis of national, regional, and urban policies and commitments. By comparing INDCs according to different metrics, it provides an overview of their future implementation. The event was co-organized by FEEM, University Luigi Bocconi, Centre for Research on Energy and Environmental Economics and Policy (IEFE) and University of Edinburgh. Re3 is pleased to publish the video of the event along with a few comments on the debate.

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Climate change is today’s big challenge and the global issue on the table of the COP21 Climate Conference in Paris, where the governments of over 180 countries have announced their plans for emissions reduction and adaptation to climate change. Local authorities, public and private entities and civil society actors are working to contribute to the fight against climate change.

“Multi-level Climate Governance: an integrated Analysis of National, Regional and Local Policies” is the title of the COP21 side-event jointly organized by Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, Bocconi University and Edinburgh University on December 9, 2015. The event was held at Le Bourget – venue of COP Paris - and it was aimed at discussing climate change policies and measures at different governance levels, ranging from the national to the regional and urban levels.

As highlighted by Prof. Carlo Carraro, Scientific Director of Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, the measures implemented or proposed by individual countries vary greatly, and the tools to assess the implementation and efficacy of such measures thus play a crucial role.

Prof. Edoardo Croci, Research Director of IEFE – Centre for Research on Energy and Environmental Economics and Policy (Bocconi University) and Benedetta Lucchitta, IEFE researcher, pointed out the huge contribution potential of subnational subjects to the global mitigation effort and to streamlining energy planning within a multilevel governance framework.

Prof. Scott Barrett, Columbia University, reflected on the efficacy and efficiency of Paris negotiations and stated that whatever the agreement reached, it will not be enough. Paris is a first step forward, but more radical decisions will be required in the future on the basis of what is agreed upon in Paris.

Prof. Massimo Tavoni, associate researcher of Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei and professor at Politecnico di Milano, evaluated the mitigation commitments proposed by each Country (within the so-called INDCs – Intended Nationally Determined Contributions) in terms of efficacy, efficiency and equity. “If the INDCs were graded at school, the report card would read 6/10 in efficacy (if implemented the INDCs would lead to significant investments in renewable energy but if the temperature increase has to remain below two degrees by the end of the century, they would have to be intensified in the long term), 5/10 in efficiency (emissions reduction goals could be achieved at a lower cost than what had been forecasted) and 7/10 in equity (distribution of mitigation costs across Countries and regions).

The benefits linked to ecosystem services were the topic of the presentation by Prof. Almut Arneth (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) who highlighted the fact that the service provided by forests is well beyond that of capturing CO2.

Prof. Christopher Kennedy (University of Toronto) discussed mitigation strategies in the urban areas, a key aspect in an increasingly urbanized world.

The Italian Ambassador in Paris, Giandomenico Magliano, closed the event by supporting the role of the INDCs and underlining the importance of climate action that is beneficial in environmental, social and economic terms.



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Almut Arneth, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Scott Barrett, Columbia University

Carlo Carraro, Scientific Director of Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei

Edoardo Croci, Research Director of IEFE – Centre for Research on Energy and Environmental Economics and Policy (Bocconi University)

Christopher Kennedy, University of Toronto

Benedetta Lucchitta, IEFE researcher

Giandomenico Magliano, Italian Ambassador in Paris

Massimo Tavoni, associate researcher of Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei and professor at Politecnico di Milano

 
   
 
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