FEEM's e-journal the "Review of Environment, Energy and Economics" is a tool for the dissemination of the work and research-based policy analysis of FEEM researchers and leading international scholars, covering the areas of environmental and energy economics and policy, and offering new insights into the challenges ahead.

HIGHLIGHTS
Challenges of the Paris Agreement
Greening the WTO
Energy: Scenarios and Challenges
Life is a Balancing Act
Energy Efficiency in Turkey
What about European Gas Markets?
ARTICLES
 
Dec
05
2013
 
Towards a Sustainable University – The Ca’ Foscari Experience
by Chiara Mio
Economics - Book Reviews
 

The path towards sustainability needs a deep cultural change, starting with the education of responsible citizens. In her recent book “Towards a Sustainable University” Chiara Mio describes a strategic and organizational sustainability approach in the context of universities, both from an academic literature perspective and from a real case example.

Nov
07
2013
 
When Collaboration becomes Value Creation. A New Relationship between Companies and Citizens
by Ilaria Pais
Economics - Articles
 

The article focuses on the rise of a model of citizenship based on responsibility and awareness of emerging challenges. Citizens and firms become partners of a commitment aimed to generate a positive impact on society, and to transform the model of Business Sustainability into an innovative and modern paradigm.

Jan
17
2013
 
Do Social Incentives Matter? Evidence from an Online Real Effort Experiment
by Mirco Tonin and Michael Vlassopoulos
Economics - Articles
 

Money matters, but is that all? This article presents evidence that social incentives can boost productivity in sectors that rely on pro-social behaviour such as health, education, and social care. It argues that this may help explain the growing popularity of Corporate Social Responsibility programmes within firms.

Feb
09
2012
 
Does Corporate Social Responsibility Pay?
by Laura Poddi and Sergio Vergalli
Economics - Articles
 

Over the past two decades there has been an increase in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) firms in OECD countries, although socially responsible behaviour is costly. Why, then, is the number of these firms on the increase? What drives companies to obtain this certification? Is there a link between group membership in CSR and better firm performance?



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